Courting trouble…?

We look at the process of becoming involved in a court case and giving evidence to court.

Andrew Martin / John Woodhouse
November 2019

Court cases are on the rise, both in private and public law. Staff are often approached by a parent to hear their account of events, to raise or concern or to complain they have not been treated fairly by the school, especially where separations are acrimonious or parents fear the local authority may get involved. There is also an increasing chance that you may be approached by either family members or the local authority to produce a statement for or give evidence to the court.

Whilst some organisations are used to going through the court process, including giving evidence in court, for many it can be a difficult and unknown process.  As one DSL stated:

“There are so many aspects of our job that we not receive training for and
there is often an assumption that we just know what to do.”

Whilst for many the main learning will come from the experience of going through the process, this Safeguarding Insight sets out a basic understanding of courts, the dos and don’ts and how our approach (for example in dealing with disclosures) can have significant implications for a court case.

We're sorry, but the rest of this post is only accessible to subscribing schools ...

Termly subscription

£99 Schools and Colleges

Subscribe today

Log In

Join safeguarding network for more information on how to identify and intervene in schools.

  • Training resources for Safeguarding Leads to use in team meetings;
  • Reference documents for additional information;
  • Handouts for school staff summarising each topic;
  • Quizzes to test staff understanding.
See sample About us